2015 Summit on Biblical Inerrancy

2015 Summit on Biblical Inerrancy

It’s hard to believe the 2015 Summit on Biblical Inerrancy is over. With 16 guest speakers and 18 general sessions, it was a power-packed week celebrating our common commitment to the absolute truth of God’s Word.

In case you missed any of general sessions, you can find summaries of each session below. Videos for the sessions can be found here and also here.

In session 1, John MacArthur opened the conference by listing four reasons why a summit on biblical inerrancy is needed. Those who love God and His Word are called to defend it. Click here for a full summary.

In session 2, Alistair Begg exposited 2 Tim. 4:1-5, emphasizing the divine charge to preach the Word in the midst of a culture that does not want to hear the truth. Click here for a full summary.

In session 3, R. C. Sproul provided an apologetic argument for defending the doctrine of inerrancy when speaking to theological liberals and others who deny the absolute truth of God’s Word. Click here for a full summary.

In session 4, Stephen Nichols used 1 Thess. 2:13 to answer the question, How did we get here? He traced American history in the 19th and 20th centuries to help explain the current theological landscape. Click here for a full summary.

In session 5, Ligon Duncan addressed 2 Timothy 3:14-17. From these verses, he showed what the Bible is (plenary verbal inspiration), what the Bible is for (correction and training), and what the Bible does (by bringing salvation and sanctification). Click here for a full summary.

In session 6, Miguel Nuñez showed that the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) requires an inerrant Bible. Such a monumental message needed an unshakable authority, which is what Christ gave the disciples in His Word. Click here for the full summary.

In session 7, Carl Trueman surveyed the Reformers’ commitment to the doctrine of inerrancy. He specifically focused on the views of Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Heinrich Bullinger. Click here for the full summary.

In session 8, Ian Hamilton preached John 10:22-39, focusing specifically on the phrase, “Scripture cannot be broken.” Hamilton reminded us that a true commitment to biblical inerrancy will reveal itself in a Christ-like lifestyle. Click here for the full summary.

In session 9, Mark Dever covered Psalm 119 in a single sermon. From this passage, he focused on what God’s Word is like, what it does, and how we should respond. Click here for the full summary.

In session 10, Steve Lawson looked at several passages (Heb. 4:12-13; James 1:23; 1 Pet. 1:23; 2:2-3; Ps. 119:105; Jer. 23:29) to demonstrate the invincible power of the inerrant Word of God. Click here to read the full summary.

In session 11, Gregory Beale showed that Matthew’s use of Hosea 11:1 (in Matthew 2:15) is not a haphazard misquoting of the Old Testament. Rather, Matthew is carefully considering Hosea’s argument based on Numbers 23-24. Click here to read the full summary.

Session 12 featured a panel Q&A with John MacArthur, Al Mohler, Ligon Duncan, Mark Dever, and Kevin DeYoung. (There was no liveblog of the Q&A.)

In session 13, Derek Thomas addressed 2 Peter 1:16-21, to show that the Bible describes itself as the perfect Word of God written through human instrumentation. Click here to read the full summary.

In session 14, Al Mohler discussed the inseparable relationship between inerrancy and hermeneutics. He articulated twelve principles of hermeneutics for pastors who affirm inerrancy. Click here to read the full summary.

In session 15, Sinclair Ferguson focused on passages from the Upper Room Discourse (John 13-17) in order to show the relationship between inerrancy and the Holy Spirit. Click here to read the full summary. 

In session 16, Iain Murray took us on a tour of late 19th-century British history, to warn us of the subtle ways in which the church’s commitment to Scripture can be undermined. Click here to read the full summary.

In session 17, Kevin DeYoung looked at Mathew 5:17-19, showing how Christ viewed the Old Testament, and how His example establishes a pattern for our commitment to inerrancy. Click here to read the full summary.

In session 18, John MacArthur concluded the conference by looking at Matthew 22:23-33. In that passage, Christ affirms biblical inerrancy by making a significant theological point about the resurrection based simply on the tense of a verb. Click here to read the summary.

  • m.flanegan

    Hoping all these and the break-out sessions will, as usual, be made available for audio download – as i have neither the time nor the technology to sit at the computer and watch videos (really need to download them to listen to at other times).